恩愛 onnai

kirsty boyle :: robotics artist

Workshop: What Actually Is Interaction? When Does it Start and Where Does It End?

9th ACM Conference on Creativity and Cognition

Workshop:  What Actually Is Interaction? When Does it Start and Where Does It End? will take place on 17th June 2013.

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**  10 May 2013 (extended) – Paper submission deadline **

Download Workshop Abstract

Workshop abstract
Interaction is being explored from a range of different perspectives, including a renewed interest in embodied cognition. There are cognitive and embodied aspects to any kind of interaction but depending on the disciplinary background, interaction may mean very different things to different people. In this workshop we are interested in sharing conceptualisations of interaction across disciplinary boundaries (eg human computer interaction, information science, cognitive science, biology, visual and performing arts, fine arts, robotics) and learning from each other as to how to value and e-value-ate “interaction”. By examining situated cognition and embodiment theory in practice, we hope to identify key issues and provide a road-map for future research which crosses disciplinary boundaries.

Workshop description
The idea for the workshop exploring the different facets of interaction came upon when two of the organisers, Chris and Kirsty, discussed an artwork built by Kirsty tree ceremony which involves a robot that moves around in a staged performance. The artifact does not have the capacity to interact with observers, certainly not in a traditional sense, but observers felt they interacted with the artifact regardless.


tree ceremony exhibited at Kunsthaus Graz, Austria 2011

Was it interaction? What is the difference between interaction and engagement? What is required to call a process that is happening, at least in a physiological or psychological way, interaction? Is this a way to understand Itsuo Sakane asserting that “all arts can be called interactive in a deep sense, if one considers viewing and interpreting a work of art as a kind of participation” (cited in Velonaki and Rye 2010).

Interaction is being explored from a range of different perspectives, including a renewed interest in embodied cognition (e.g., van Dijk & Frens at Creativity & Cognition 2011) which emphasizes the fundamental role of the body in enabling cognition. The body also has some sort of in between role mediating between cognition and the environment which means there are cognitive and embodied aspects to any kind of interaction.

Depending on the disciplinary background, interaction may mean very different things to different people (Haque et al 2009). Interaction with a painting or a photograph appears to be different from interaction with an audience. Does the Mona Lisa look at you? Does Marcel Duchamp’s declaration, “The spectator makes the picture” (Rokeby 1995) help us with evaluation in human computer interaction (HCI)? Höök et al 2003 discuss some of the difficulties of relating ‘traditional’ HCI evaluation methods esp. usability testing to digital art. Interaction design (eg Preece 2011) helps build ‘applied’ bridges between different disciplines by offering evaluation methods that go beyond technical contexts but does not actually answer the question as to what constitutes interaction eg when does it make sense to speak of ‘interaction’?

In this workshop we are interested in sharing conceptualisations of interaction across disciplinary boundaries (eg human computer interaction, information science, cognitive science, biology, visual and performing arts, fine arts, robotics) and learning from each other as to how to assess and evaluate “interaction”. By examining situated cognition and embodiment theory in practice, we hope to identify key issues and provide a roadmap for future research which crosses disciplinary boundaries.

Call for submissions
We ask prospective participants to submit a 4-page position paper addressing a topic relevant to the theme of the workshop and/or a 2-page personal statement describing their research, current interests, questions as relevant to the workshop. Personal statements should be used to explain the potential relevance of the participant’s work for the workshop, what they can offer and the relevance of the workshop for their work.

Submitted papers will be selected on the basis of their relevance, quality and ability to stimulate discussion.

Upon request we will organize peer-reviewing of full written papers. The organisers will explore options for publishing the papers in a journal special issue.The organisers will also explore options for publishing the papers in a journal special issue.

All submissions should be sent directly to the organisers (christopher.lueg@utas.edu.au) in PDF format using the SIGCHI template files found here.

Important dates
10 May 2013 (extended) – Paper submission deadline
17 May 2013 – Notification of acceptance
24 May 2013 – Camera ready submission
17 June 2013 – See you in Sydney at the Workshop

Venue
The workshop will take place within the Creative Robotics Laboratory at the National Institute of Experimental Arts, University of New South Wales-

Creative Robotics Laboratory
National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA)
COFA, University of New South Wales
Cnr of Oxford St and Greens Rd
Paddington, NSW 2021.

Target group
The workshop welcomes researchers, designers and artists interested in embodiment and perception, including those working with bodily movement, theatric performances, and tangible or intangible media. The expected number of participants is between 8-15 people.

Confirmed Keynote speakers
Professor Catherine Stevens – Research Program Leader of Music Cognition and Action at the MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney

Associate Professor Mari Velonaki – Director of the Creative Robotics Lab, at the National Institute of Experimental Arts, University of New South Wales.

Workshop program – 17th June 2013
The full-day program consists of two parts.

In the morning invited Keynote presentations will focus on discussing theoretical aspects of embodiment, behavior and perception, and what it means for interaction. What actually is “interaction” and when do we call it interaction?

For the lunch break we will identify suitable lunch locations (at attendees’s own expense).

In the afternoon we will focus on putting the insights into practice by discussing examples provided by participants. “Setting the stage” will be followed by 5-10 min presentations by attendees. The focus is on making people think, not on ‘formal’ paper presentations. Participants are explicitly encouraged to bring props that can be used to illustrate a point.

Organizers
Dr. Christopher Lueg is a Professor of Computing at the University of Tasmania (Australia) where he convenes the Information and Interaction (i2) research group. In 2009-2012 he was appointed Honorary Research Fellow at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA). Dr Lueg is teaching and researching in human-computer interaction, interaction design, and ubiquitous computing.

An area of long standing interest is embodiment, cognition and perception, and how this is reflected in studies of human behavior including wayfinding and information behavior. In this line of work Dr Lueg has examined the “problem solving” assumption frequently found in the information behavior literature and, more recently, how perception mediates the amount of information available to information seekers (Lueg 2012).

Kirsty Boyle uses her training in puppetry, performance and mechatronics engineering to explore the cultural and societal aspects of robotics. Her work tree ceremony 2010 is an intricate automata doll performance featuring the kimono clad robot Suki. Through dance, Suki honors the living bonsai tree beside her, presenting a choreographed recital reminiscent of movements influenced by traditional Japanese dance. This work incorporates advanced Artificial Intelligence techniques with traditional automata craft practice which draws upon Boyle’s comprehensive knowledge of Japanese mechanical doll making known as Karakuri Ningyo. Since 2002, Boyle has studied with Mr Tamaya Shobei, a ninth generation Karakuri Ningyo craftsman and last remaining mechanical doll Master in Japan from an unbroken lineage. Boyle is currently his only student and the only woman to have ever been trained in the tradition. tree ceremony was commissioned by the Tinguely Museum, Switzerland and the Kunsthaus Graz, Austria, for the touring ‘Robot Dreams’ exhibition 2010-11 and awarded “Highly Commended” in the Australian National New Media Art Award 2012.

References
[1] Rogers, Y., Sharp, H., Preece, J. (2011). Interaction Design: Beyond Human – Computer Interaction, 3rd Edition. Wiley.
[2] Van Dijk, J. & Frens, J. (2011). Workshop “The challenge of embodied cognition for design” held at ACM Creativity and Cognition 2011 conference on Thursday, November 3rd 2011 in Atlanta GA, USA.
[3] Höök, K., Sengers, P. and Andersson, G. (2003). “Sense and sensibility: evaluation and interactive art”. Proc. CHI. ACM.
[4] Lueg, C. (2012). “Characteristics of human perception and their relevance when studying information behavior”. Accepted for publication subject to revisions in Journal of Documentation, Emerald.
[5] I. Sakane, as quoted in D. Rokeby (1995). Transforming mirrors: Subjectivity and control in interactive media”, in S. Penny (ed.), Critical Issues in Interactive Media, SUNY Press.
[6] Velonaki, M. and Rye, D. (2010) Human-Robot Interaction in a Media Art Environment. In Workshop: What Do Collaborations with the Arts Have to Say about HRI?, Human-Robot Interaction 2010.
[7] Haque, U., Dubberly H. & Pangaro, P. (2009). What is Interaction? Are there different types? Interactions Jan. 2009. ACM.